Friday, December 02, 2011

Mobile Application Architecture, Part 1

The boom in mobile applications has been fueled by excellent application frameworks from Apple and Google. Cocoa Touch and Android take some very different approaches on many things, but both enable developers to create applications that end users enjoy. Of course "excellent" can be a relative term, and in this case the main comparison is web application development. For both experienced and novice developers, it takes less effort to be more productive developing a native mobile application than a web application (mobile or not.) This despite the fact that you really have to deal with a lot more complexity in a mobile app (memory, threads, etc.) than you do for web applications.

Despite having significant advantages over web development, mobile applications often have some similar qualities and this often leads to similar limitations. Most mobile applications are network based. They use the network to get information and allow you to interact with other users. Before mobile applications, this was the realm of web applications. Mobile apps have shown that there is not necessary to use a browser to host an application that is network based. That's good. However the way that mobile apps interact with servers over the network has tended to resemble the way that web applications do this. Here's a picture that shows this.
Traditional mobile app architecture
This diagram shows a traditional mobile application's architecture. In particular it shows an Android app, hence that little red box on the right saying C2DM, which we will talk more about later. Most of this is applicable to iOS as well though. Most apps get data from servers or send data to servers using HTTP, the same protocol used by web browsers. HTTP is wonderfully simple in most ways. Significantly, it is a short-lived, synchronous communication. You make a request and you wait until you get a response. You then use the response to update the state of your application, show things to the user, etc.

Now since HTTP is synchronous and network access is notoriously slow (especially for mobile apps), you must inevitably banish HTTP communication to a different thread than the one where you respond to user interactions. This simple paradigm becomes the basis for how many mobile applications are built. Android provides some nice utilities for handling this scenario like AsyncTask and Loaders. Folks from the Android team have written numerous blogs and presentations on the best way to setup an application that follows this pattern, precisely because this pattern is so prevalent in mobile applications. It is the natural first step from web application to mobile application as you can often re-use much of the backend systems that you used for web applications.

Before we go any further, take another look at the diagram. I promised to talk more about it. That is the cloud-to-device messaging system that is part of Android (or at least Google's version, it's not available on the Kindle Fire for example.) It provides a way for data to get to the application without the usual HTTP. Your server can send a message to C2DM servers, which will then "push" the message to the device and your app. This is done through a persistent TCP socket between the device and the C2DM servers. Now these messages are typically very small, so often it is up to your application to retrieve additional data -- which could very well go back to using HTTP. Background services on Android can makes this very simple to do.

Notice that in the previous paragraph we never once used the word "notification." C2DM was seen by many as Android's equivalent to Apple's Push Notifications. They can definitely fulfill the same use cases. Once your service receives the message it can then choose to raise a notification on the device for the user to respond to. But C2DM is not limited to notifications, bot by a long shot. Publishing a notification is just one of many things that your application can do with the message that it receives from C2DM. What is most interesting about C2DM is that leads us into another type of application architecture not built around HTTP. In part 2 of this post we will take a deeper look at event-driven architectures.

5 comments:

Michael Angelo said...

waiting for the 2nd one hehehe

tomcruse said...

excellent blog! thanks for sharing your experience of mobile applications....
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Abi Abiah said...

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Mobile app Development said...

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